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Congressman Rick Hill Led Charge Against Middle Class Workers

Helena, Mont. – As a candidate for governor, Congressman Rick Hill often talks about creating jobs. But, he fails to mention that while serving as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, he led the charge against hard working, middle class families in our state.  He even claimed that a $1 per hour pay raise for minimum wage employees would be “harmful” to workers (1).

 

“As Montana’s lone representative, Congressman Hill fought against the best interests of working families,” said Ted Dick, Executive Director of the Montana Democratic Party. “He led the fight against middle class Montanans by opposing a modest increase in the minimum wage, supporting a corporate fat cat measure that forced employees to take time off instead of receiving overtime pay, and backed a bill exempting workers from receiving compensation for overtime. Everyday Montanans need to know these facts about Congressman Hill’s background before voting this year.” 

 

Key Examples of Congressman Hill Fighting Against Middle Class Montanans Include:

 

Ø  Led Charge Against Minimum Wage Increase: Hill voted against legislation that would have increased the federal minimum wage by $1 per hour – from $5.15 to $6.15 per hour (2). Hill said that he opposed a minimum wage increase for hard working Montanans because additional pay would be “harmful to both workers and employers in Montana” (3).

 

Ø  Backed Measure Forcing Workers into Taking Time Off Instead of Receiving Overtime Pay: Hill voted for a measure that would have forced employees to take time off instead of receiving overtime pay (4). If signed into law, the bill Hill supported would have also made an employee’s use of this time off completely at the discretion of his or her employer (5).

 

Ø  Supported Exemption of Workers from Overtime Pay: Hill supported a bill aimed at exempting workers from overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act (6).

 

“Congressman Hill was the lone voice for Montana in the U.S. House of Representatives and he failed to stand up for middle class voters,” said Dick.

 

Check the Facts (Sources):

1. Valley Press, “Hill Would Oppose Minimum Wage Bill,” May 1, 1996.

2. Roll Call 45, Hr 3846, March 9, 2000.

3. Valley Press, “Hill Would Oppose Minimum Wage Bill,” May 1, 1996.

4. Roll Call 59, HR1, March 19, 1997.

5. American Federation of Government Employees, “Voting Record,” 1997.

6. Roll Call 228, HR 2888, June 11, 1998.

 

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